Corn, Peaches, and Sunsets

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Gifts of food from Yutaka san and Kurokawa san

After sharing stories of their connection with nature, the locals thought it best to also share some of their harvest with us as well. Delicious, sweet Megijima corn was our snack this afternoon, and some cute little cucumbers are next, courtesy of Yutaka san and Kurokawa san.

Gifts of food from Yutaka san and Kurokawa san
Gifts of food from Yutaka san and Kurokawa san

We had a visit from Professor Suizu and Kei today, as they brought us good cheer, scheduling plans, and some sweet Japan peaches. Perfect for the ‘momotaro’ team!

As we wind up interviewing, one of the photo-related tasks left is to use the geographic points and stories to create coordinating imagery which helps tell the story of the human:nature connection.

That pretty much boils down to us doing a bit of research between the interview content and our Megijima topographic map, and then trekking around the island to find the spots which are particularly significant to the locals here. In approaching the landscape photography, I must keep the story of the person who chose this spot and their human:nature relationship in mind, and along with that, create a brand new relationship between myself and the land.

The fishing boat harbor at dusk on Megijima, Japan
The fishing boat harbor at dusk on Megijima, Japan

Last evening, Suhee and I walked past the fishing ship yards on the East of the island and out to the small, unmanned lighthouse on the Southern tip.

The un-manned Megijima lighthouse on the southern tip of the island
The un-manned Megijima lighthouse on the southern tip of the island
Suhee, taking a photo from above the lighthouse in Megijima, Japan
Suhee, taking a photo from above the lighthouse in Megijima, Japan

Doubling back from the lighthouse, we split ways and I took a hike up to the top of the ridge, where there is hidden, a ‘secret’ sunset watching spot… a very ‘homegrown’ spot which seems to be taken care of by locals vs. the government, the latter being how these places are usually maintained. However it is, the spot was just a bit more wild, fresh timber bench and all. A good secret, indeed.

The secret Megijima sunset viewing spot.
The secret Megijima sunset viewing spot.
An old sign identifying Megijima (Onigashima), now slightly hidden in the hillside plantlife with Takamatsu in the distance.
An old sign identifying Megijima (Onigashima), now slightly hidden in the hillside plantlife with Takamatsu in the distance.

One Reply to “Corn, Peaches, and Sunsets”

  1. Excited to see the topographic map! It’s interesting how people’s memories are enriching or activating the landscape, giving it a deeper meaning and a way for appreciation.. If memories could be seen, the world would overflow with them! Perhaps the memories are our ties to the landscape, and the landscape is what holds our memories and gives us roots to stand on.

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